HUNTING FAQs

Frequently Asked Questions

How can I get more than 1 elk using the ABC lists?





How do I apply for preference points?


You can also accumulate preference points every year simply by entering the “Preference Point Hunt Code” as the first choice on your application. Deer: D-P-999-99-P
Elk: E-P-999-99-P
Antelope: A-P-999-99-P For elk, the preference point hunt code is E-P-999-99-P. Entering this as your first choice allows you to build preference points, while also giving you the opportunity to apply for—and possibly draw—a license for your second, third or fourth choices. Keep in mind, preference points are only used when you successfully draw a license as your first-choice selection on the application.




Can my 11 year old daughter apply for the draw on deer or elk?


At age 11, youth may buy or apply for a license if they will turn 12 before the end of season on the license. Youth cannot hunt with the license until they turn 12.




How does the leftover draw work?





What is the best calibre for elk?


Generally it is recommended that a 30.06 and higher be used for Elk. But much depends upon the individual's experience in hunting large game and how well they know their weapon (confindence). The more experienced and stable hunter have used .243 and .270s. If inexperienced it is recommended to start with the 30.06 or equivalent.




How do I find the best DIY units?





If I get a DIY archery tag for elk do I have to hunt only 1 unit?





I'm new to hunting how can I find someone to help me?





Will my hunter education card from Virginia be legal in Colorado?


Yes, hunter education cards from other states are accepted when you apply for a Colorado hunting tag.




Are there OTC tags for mule deer in Colorado?


No, most deer licenses are limited and available only through the draw. Over-the-counter licenses for white-tailed deer are available in certain units with lower populations.




What is the best unit for OTC pronghorn antelope?





Is there whitetail deer in Colorado?


Yes. Mostly found in south central Colorado beginning in GMU 851 and northward to GMUs 48 and 49. A separate tag is needed for Whitetail.




Is it against the law to pick up shed antlers?


No, but there are specific date and area restrictions in place. SHED ANTLER COLLECTION CLOSURE ▶ WEST OF I-25, PUBLIC LANDS:The public lands west of I-25 are open to collecting shed antlers or horns from May 1–Dec. 31 ONLY, except in GMUs 54, 55, 66, 67 and 551, where collecting antlers or horns is further restricted to between legal sunset and 10:00 a.m., May 1–May 15. Possession of antlers or horns on public lands west of I-25 from Jan. 1–April 30, is prohibited. ▶ WEST OF I-25, PRIVATE LANDS:On private lands west of I-25, any person may, with lawful access, collect shed antlers or horns at any time. ▶ EAST OF I-25, PUBLIC AND PRIVATE LANDS:On any lands east of I-25, any person may, with lawful access, collect shed antlers or horns at any time. NOTE: Public land management agencies may have additional restrictions on use of public lands and removal of shed antlers. Refer to land manager restrictions prior to shed hunting.




Can I use my ATV to drag out game?


Most areas do not allow off-trail game retrieval with any motorized vehicle. Contact each public land management agency for their current motor vehicle-use rules, regulations, agency maps and game retrieval specifications and hours.




What's the best way to hunt wild turkey?





What information do I need to start the hunting application process?


WHAT YOU NEED TO BUY A LICENSE 1. ID. Secure and verifiable ID. A Social Security number is required for hunters ages 12 and older. 2. PROOF of hunter education. 3. PROOF of residency for Colorado residents, otherwise will need to apply as a non-resident. 4. HABITAT STAMP. A 2019 or lifetime Habitat Stamp is required prior to buying a license or purchasing a qualifying license to apply for the draw for anyone ages 18–64. 5. For big game applications, you will also need to purchase a qualifying license, which is either a spring turkey or small game license.




What fees, stamps and licenses do I need to pay and apply for?


2019 Fees APPLICATION PROCESSING FEE ■ Resident.....................................................$7 Per species, per draw & nonrefundable ■ Nonresident ...............................................$9 Per species, per draw & nonrefundable NEW QUALIFYING LICENSES All applicants, including youth, must purchase a qualifying hunting license to apply for the big game draw. RESIDENT FEE ■ Spring turkey....................... $29.75 (youth: $15.75) ■ Annual small game.............$29.75 (youth: $1.25) ■ Small game/fishing combo..$49.75 ■ Veteran's lifetime combo.....free* *Resident only, 60% disabled or Purple Heart recipient NONRESIDENT ■ Spring turkey....................... $151.75 (youth: $101.75) ■ Annual small game.............$81.75 (youth: $1.25) All license fees include a 25-cent search-and-rescue fee and a $1.50 fee for the Wildlife Education Fund, if applicable. HABITAT STAMP FEE ■ 2019 Habitat Stamp...................................$10 Required & nonrefundable ■ Lifetime Habitat Stamp..............................$300.25 Only one is required per person, ages 18–64, per year buying or applying for a license, unless you hold a Lifetime Habitat Stamp. NEW PREFERENCE & WEIGHTED POINT FEE Moose, Rocky Mountain bighorn sheep ■ Resident (age 18 or older)....................................$50 ■ Nonresident (age 18 or older) ..............................$100




What are the rules for transporting game?


1. You can be cited for illegally transporting game animals even if someone else made an error. When you transport carcasses or processed meat: a. Carcasses must be properly tagged. You must meet evidence of sex and antlerpoint requirements. Hunters must keep their own license. b. Carcass tags or donation certificates (for 20 pounds of meat or less) must accompany processed game meat. 2. Carcass tags must be securely attached to carcass, not antlers or horns, or must accompany processed meat. 3. To ship by commercial carrier, the license, photocopy of license, carcass tag or donation certificate must accompany carcass or processed meat. 4. Hunters transporting game through national parks or monuments must follow federal regulations. Contact the National Park Service. 5. Nonresident hunters should follow their home state regulations in place for transporting harvested deer, elk or moose back from a state known to have CWD (Chronic Wasting Disease).




What are basic things I need when I arrive in Colorado for a hunt?


A Colorado hunting license (your hunting tags) Your actual hunter safety card (no copies, faxes are accepted). If you were born before January 1, 1949 you are not required to have a hunter safety card. Except for archery hunters during bow season, you must wear 500 sq inches of blaze orange or pink while hunting (a blaze orange or pink hat and vest equal 500 sq inches).




How does the preference point system work?


When applying for a limited license, a preference point is awarded when an individual is unsuccessful in drawing their first-choice hunt code. Preference points provide a mathematical advantage when applied to future drawings. Some things to remember: * Preference points are awarded by species, not hunt code. A point can be used to apply for any type of license available for that species. * A preference point is awarded only for unsuccessful applications for a first-choice hunt code. * Use a preference point hunt code as your first choice if your goal is to accumulate points for use toward a future quality hunt. Points needed can change significantly from year to year. * For bear, elk, deer and pronghorn, you will accumulate preference points until you are successful in drawing a first-choice license. If you draw your first choice, your preference points drop to zero. There is no “banking” of preference points. * If you do not apply or hold a license for that species at least once within 10 consecutive years for a bear, elk, deer or pronghorn, your preference points for that species will be lost. • For bighorn sheep, moose and mountain goat, an applicant can accumulate a maximum of three points. Future applications are pooled with other three-point applicants. If you are unsuccessful in the pooled drawing, a “mathematically weighted” point is awarded to increase the probability of drawing a future license. You must apply at least once in a consecutive 10-year period to keep your points. * Nonresident allocations are determined by the average number of preference points a Colorado resident needs to draw a specific license during a 3-year period. For hunt codes that required six or more points for a Colorado resident to draw an elk or deer license, up to 20 percent may go to nonresidents. For hunt codes that required fewer than six points for a Colorado resident to draw an elk or deer license, up to 35 percent may go to nonresidents. * A Colorado Habitat Stamp is required to buy or apply for a license. The Habitat Stamp may be purchased online, by phone or at any Wildlife Service Center or license agent. How long will it take to draw a license? Statistics from previous years may be used to estimate the approximate time required to successfully draw a license. For example: If a unit allowed 20 licenses with 60 applicants, zero preference points required, 40 were unsuccessful. These 40 would be awarded a preference point. Assuming that the quota for this unit remained the same for 2016, and these 40 apply, 20 will draw a license using their preference point and 20 will be awarded a second point. An applicant with no points could expect to draw a license in three years. Preference-point requirements can be found at the Colorado Parks and Wildlife website. Go to the Big Game hunting page at cpw.state.co.us.




What paperwork must I follow when I go hunting?


WHAT YOU NEED TO HUNT ▶ Hunters must have a license to hunt. Sign it and carry the original with you while hunting. ▶ A hunter may hunt only the animal, sex, season, units and method of take authorized by the license. Complete season dates may not be printed on the license because of space constraints. Check the details for your specific license. ▶ It is illegal to give false information to obtain a license. It also is illegal to alter a license or to loan, transfer, sell or give your license to someone else. ▶ If you lose or destroy your license, a duplicate is available for half the price of the original license, not to exceed $25. You can get a duplicate before the season opens from any sales agent. After the season begins, duplicate licenses are available only at CPW locations. ▶ Licenses expire on the expiration date printed on the license. ▶ Nonresidents can continue to use their combo fishing license after harvesting a big-game animal, as long as the carcass tag is the only part of the license that has been detached. The rest of the license must remain intact.




What are some of the illegal things that are prohibited while hunting?


Here are some of the items listed in the Colorado Hunting Guidelines. If convicted of felony violations, you can face a lifetime license suspension. 1. FELONY OFFENSE: To kill and abandon big game. It is illegal to remove only the hide, antlers or other trophy parts and leave the carcass in the field. 2. FELONY OFFENSE:To sell, buy or offer to sell or buy big game. 3. FELONY OFFENSE: To solicit someone to illegally kill big game for commercial gain or provide outfitting services without required registration. IT IS ALSO AGAINST THE LAW TO: 4. Have a loaded (in the chamber) rifle or shotgun in or on any motor vehicle. Muzzleloading rifles are considered unloaded if the percussion cap or shotshell primer is removed, or if the powder is removed from flashpan. It is illegal for anyone to have a loaded electronic-ignition muzzleloader in or on a motor vehicle unless the chamber is unloaded or the battery is disconnected and removed from its compartment. 5. Carry firearms (except handguns) on an OHV during deer, elk, pronghorn and bear seasons unless they are unloaded in the chamber and magazine. Firearms (except handguns) and bows carried on an OHV must be fully enclosed in a hard or soft case. Scabbards or cases with open ends or sides are prohibited. This does not apply to landowners or their agents who carry a firearm on an OHV to take depredating wildlife on property they own or lease. 6. Establish a permanent structure or plant vegetation on CPW-owned land or waters. Only portable blinds and tree stands for big-game hunting can be erected on CPW land, and no more than 30 days prior to the season during which they will be used. No nails can be driven into trees. Manmade materials for blinds or stands must be removed within 10 days after the season they are used in ends. The owner’s Customer Identification (CID) number and dates of use must be visible on outside of portable blinds or underside of tree stands. Placement of blinds or stands does not reserve them for personal use; they may be used on first-come, first-served basis. 7. Hunt carelessly or discharge a firearm or release an arrow disregarding human life or property. 8. Operate or ride a snowmobile with a firearm unless it’s completely unloaded and cased, or with a bow unless it’s unstrung or cased. Compound bows must be cased, not unstrung. 9. Shoot from or use a motor vehicle, motorcycle, off-highway vehicle, snowmobile or aircraft to hunt, intercept, chase, harass or drive wildlife. 10. Use aircraft to hunt, to direct hunters on the ground or to hunt the same day or day after a flight was made to find wildlife. 11. Use the Internet or other computer-assisted remote technology while hunting or fishing. This includes unmanned or remote-control drones used to look for wildlife. Hunters and anglers must be physically present in the immediate vicinity while hunting and fishing. 12. Hunt under the influence of alcohol or controlled substances. 13. Use artificial light as an aid in hunting. 14. Use poison, drugs or explosives to hunt or harass wildlife. 15. Fail to extinguish a campfire. 16. Fail to make a reasonable attempt to track and kill animals you wound or may have wounded. It is against the law to pursue wounded wildlife that goes on private property without first obtaining permission from landowner or person in charge. 17. Fail to reasonably dress, care for and prepare edible wildlife meat for human consumption. At a minimum, the four quarters, tenderloins and backstraps are edible meat. Internal organs are not considered edible meat. 18. Hunt with rifles, handguns or shotguns firing a single slug, or archery equipment within an area 50 feet on each side of the center line of any state highway or municipal or county road, as designated by the county. 19. Discharge any firearm or release an arrow from, upon or across any public road. 20. Party hunt (i.e. kill someone else’s game or let someone kill yours). 21. Interfere with hunters. This includes distracting or frightening prey; causing prey to flee by using light or noise; chasing prey on foot or by vehicle; throwing objects; making movements; harassing hunters by using threats or actions; erecting barriers to deny access to hunting areas; intentionally injecting yourself into the line of fire. Violators face prosecution and may have to pay victim’s damages and court costs. 22. For two or more people on the ground, in a vehicle or vessel to use electronic devices to communicate information that violates any wildlife law or regulation. 23. Use dogs. 24. Hunt big game over bait, whether or not the person hunting personally placed the bait. Bait means to put, expose, distribute or scatter salt, minerals, grain, animal parts or other food as an attraction for big game. Salt or mineral blocks used for normal agricultural purposes are not considered bait. Scent sticks that smell like food are illegal for bears. 25. Kill cubs or bears accompanied by one or more cubs. A cub is a bear less than a year old. 26. Hunt bears in their dens. 27. Have a carcass, hide, skull, claws or parts of bears or mountain lions without a valid hunting license or unless authorized by CPW. 28. Sell, trade, barter or offer to sell, trade or barter bear gall bladders or edible portions of bears. 29. Hunt on private land without first obtaining permission from landowner or person in charge. 30. Post, sign or indicate that public lands, not under an exclusive-control lease, are private. 31. Use State Land Board properties not leased and signed by CPW without permission of lessee.




How do I properly tag and transport my carcass?


▶ You must attach a carcass tag to animals you harvest per instructions on tag. Tags must be signed, dated and detached from the license immediately upon harvest. ▶ The carcass tag should be attached to the carcass (not to detached hides, horns, antlers or carried separately) immediately prior to and during transportation in any vehicle, or while in camp or at a residence or other place of storage. Tags must stay on until meat is processed and remain with meat until consumed. ▶ The carcass tag, when dated, signed and attached to the species lawfully taken or killed and lawfully in possession, authorizes the possession, use, storage, and transportation of the carcass, or any part thereof. ▶ It is illegal to sign or tear the tag before harvesting an animal. ▶ Do not remove any parts of a license except the carcass tag after harvest. Doing so voids the license and you must buy a duplicate. The upper part of the license must be kept by whoever harvested the animal. ▶ If you lose, accidentally destroy or detach the tag, you must buy a duplicate from a CPW office before hunting and prove the loss, detachment or destruction was accidental. ▶ If you have a nonresident big game/fishing combo license, the fishing license is valid after the carcass tag is detached, as long as the rest of the license is intact. There are two signature areas on your hunting license: 1. Review all information on your license and sign on the upper signature line as soon as you receive it. 2. Detach and sign the carcass tag portion only AFTER harvesting your animal. You must then attach the tag to the carcass TRANSPORTING GAME 1. You can be cited for illegally transporting game animals even if someone else made an error. When you transport carcasses or processed meat: a. Carcasses must be properly tagged. You must meet evidence of sex and antlerpoint requirements. Hunters must keep their own license. b. Carcass tags or donation certificates (for 20 pounds of meat or less) must accompany processed game meat. 2. Carcass tags must be securely attached to carcass, not antlers or horns, or must accompany processed meat. 3. To ship by commercial carrier, the license, photocopy of license, carcass tag or donation certificate must accompany carcass or processed meat. 4. Hunters transporting game through national parks or monuments must follow federal regulations. Contact the National Park Service. 5. Nonresident hunters should follow their home state regulations in place for transporting harvested deer, elk or moose back from a state known to have CWD




What are the requirements for evidence of sex?


1. It is illegal to have or transport a big-game carcass without evidence of sex naturally attached. It is illegal to have only detached evidence of sex accompany the carcass. If you submit a deer or elk head for CWD testing, leave evidence of sex on the carcass. 2. EVIDENCE OF SEX IS: A. BUCK/BULL: Head with antlers or horns attached to carcass; or testicle, scrotum or penis attached to carcass. B. DOE/COW:Head, udder (mammary) or vulva attached to carcass. C. BLACK BEAR: Male: testicles or penis. Female: vulva. 3. Heads detached from carcass are not adequate evidence of sex. 4. If a carcass is cut in pieces or deboned, evidence of sex needs to be attached to a quarter or another major part of carcass. All portions must be transported together. 5. Evidence of sex is not required if a donation certificate accompanies less than 20 pounds of meat or after the carcass is cut into processed meat, wrapped and frozen, or stored at licensee’s home. TIP:If you shoot a young buck or bull with antlers less than 5 inches long, it can be considered “antlerless.” But what do you do about evidence of sex? ▶Leave the head and antlers naturally attached to a portion of the carcass to prove it meets the requirement. ▶Leave the testicles attached to a portion of the carcass, and then you can detach the head or skull plate and carry it out with the antlers intact.




What are the requirements after I killed a bear?


Hunters must personally present bears to a CPW office for a free inspection, check report and sealing within FIVE working days after the kill. Bear heads and hides must be unfrozen when presented for inspection. Seals must be attached to the hide until tanned. Contact the nearest CPW office or CPW officer for inspection and sealing. At inspection, CPW is authorized to extract and keep a premolar tooth. If the head and hide are frozen, CPW may keep them long enough to thaw so that a tooth can be removed. Hunters can help by making sure the jaw is propped open with a stick before rigor sets in. Bears cannot be taken out of Colorado until hide and skull are inspected and sealed. Having a bear hide without a seal after the five-day period is illegal, and the hide becomes state property. To transport a bear or parts to a foreign country, you must first obtain CITES documents. Contact the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, 303-342-7430. Do not call the U.S Fish and Wildlife Service about inspections or seals for bears.




How do I preserve the most meat?


CARING FOR YOUR ANIMAL AFTER THE KILL Getting The Highest Yield
Properly handling your game animal in the field is one of the most important things you can do to help increase your yields and have your animal taste its best. Here are few steps you can take to help us get you a better yield. 1. Take a Good Shot Where you shoot your animal does effect how much meat you will yield from your animal. Multiple shots also will effect the yield. 2. Get the Guts Out Timely removal of the animal's guts is key to keeping your meat free from bacteria growth. Work fast but also with care. Cutting into the entrails will lead to spoilage and possible destruction of your entire animal. 3. Skinning The animal's hide is their winter coat so to speak and helps create warmth to help the animal survive. Getting the hide off as soon as possible helps prevent spoilage and bacteria growth. After you skin the animal, cover it with a game cloth or a bed sheet to help absorb the blood and protect the carcass. Tarps and plastic bags are not recommended and can actually attach to the meat and create loss due to cutting. 4. Cool Your Meat Down Removing the guts and hide will begin the cooling process but in warm weather, the meat will still be subject to loss. The ideal temperature your meat should be kept at is 32 to 40 degrees. At this temperature, you are less likely to experience bacteria growth. Store your meat in a cooler or on top of ice packs or bottles of frozen water. Placing ice inside the cavity is not recommennded and can also lead to bacterial growth and effect the texture of your meat.




How does a group hunt work?


Colorado allows you to apply as a group when applying for big-game licenses. This means that you and a few of your closest friends can all hunt together this fall—if you plan accordingly. But here’s the catch: You must select a group leader and everyone must apply using this person’s customer identification number (you played “Follow the Leader” as a kid, right?). Everyone must enter the group leader’s CID number in the “Group Leader CID” box on the application. In addition, every person in the group must enter the same hunt code, GMU, species and season. The only variation allowed on a group application is species sex (i.e. one person can apply for a cow elk license, while others apply for bull elk tags). If one person in the group makes a mistake or enters the wrong information, everyone’s application may be rejected. Also, keep in mind the smaller the group the better the chance of everyone drawing a license. Group tags are allocated based on preference points and draw success hinges on the person with the fewest number of points. So, make sure you know the preference-point requirements for the licenses you select, and choose your hunting partners wisely.




Can I turn my tag in if I decide not to hunt?


Colorado allows you to turn in your tag prior to the hunt start date. Hunters that choose to turn in will need to send a refund application along with their license, prior to opening day. Hunters can choose to either get a refund or a preference point reinstated but cannot receive both.




What's the best preferece point strategy?


Zero Preference Points: Deer
Look at archery or muzzleloader hunts. Bowhunters can hunt some of the best units in the state with 0 points. Many of these units have some high country that allows hunters to get away from crowds. Hunters that like to hunt with a rifle should apply for second-season rifle hunts or a third-season tag on an unpopular unit. Elk
We suggest that you purchase a point and if you have a strong desire to hunt elk, look at the over-the-counter options. There are a number of over-the-counter permits available for bowhunters and rifle hunters. Antelope
There are a limited amount of units that can be drawn with 0 points. Most of these are archery-only tags and draw success varies from year to year. The best strategy is to build points to be used in the future. What can I do with 3 or 4 points? Deer
Apply for hard-to-draw high country muzzleloader hunts, or third-season rifle tags on good units. With 3-4 points you can look at units that have fair numbers of 160-180” B&C class deer. Mule deer hunters in this point range have a number of units to choose from. Elk
Hunters should look at archery and muzzleloader tags. Some of the more remote wilderness units can be drawn with 4 points and will give hunters an opportunity at 300-320” class bulls. The season dates are favorable for archery and muzzleloader hunters giving you the opportunity to hunt during the rut. Great time to be in the field in Colorado elk hunting. Antelope
If you want to hunt now, look to apply for units that have a high number of nonresident tags. Archery-only tags can be drawn in some units with 3-4 points. If you are looking to harvest a book-class goat we suggest building points to use in the future. What can I expect with 10 or more points? Deer
Rifle hunters should be looking at 4th season tags. The fourth-season rifle hunt starts in early-mid November and allows hunters the opportunity to chase deer in the early stages of the rut. A few units in the very southern end of the state may not see rut activity, but the majority of the units in Colorado will. A hunter that has a fourth-season deer tag can anticipate chasing bucks that will score in the 180-200” class. Elk
Applicants with 10 or more points should be looking at the top units in the state. Choose the weapon that you want to hunt with and look at units that have high success rates. With a number of season dates on each unit hunters should look at when they want to be in the field and what time of the year works best for them. Colorado offers multiple season dates and weapon types for the top units in the state. 330 plus class animals can be harvested on nearly every draw unit in the state with a few of the top end units producing bulls in the 350-370 inch class every year. Keep in mind that the number of nonresident tags available for the very best hunt choices is minimal, and the points needed to draw continues to climb for these few choices. The point creep can climb as much as one point per year for some of the highest demand seasons. Antelope
With 10 or more points, hunters can begin to hunt some of the better units in the state. Many of the better units in Colorado contain a large quantity of private land and hunters will want to obtain access prior to applying for a permit. Hunters may want to look at some of the primitive weapon hunts that are available on the top tier units.





Hunting Terminology

DAILY BAG LIMIT


maximum number of wildlife you can take in a day, including any eaten or donated during the day they're taken.




FURBEARERS (Small Game)


mink; pine marten; badger; red, gray, swift fox; striped, western-spotted skunk; beaver; muskrat; long-tailed, short-tailed weasel; coyote; bobcat; opossum; ring-tailed cat; raccoon




POSSESSION LIMIT


maximum number of wildlife you can have at any time, including in the field, in transport, at home or in storage




AGGREGATE


Total number of animals allowed to be taken in one day, by one person, regardless of species




HABITAT STAMP


Habitat Stamps are REQUIRED for hunters and cost $10; only one is required per person, per year for anyone ages 18–64. Stamps are valid April 1 of current year thru March 31 of next year. ▶ A Habitat Stamp ($10) will automatically be added to your first hunting or fishing license purchase of each license year, if applicable. ▶ A lifetime stamp is $300.25. ▶ Anyone who holds a free lifetime fishing license, a veteran's lifetime combination small-game/fishing license or are approved for the Big Game Mobility Impaired Hunting Program is exempt from the Habitat Stamp requirement. See cpw.state.co.us/accessibility ▶ When you purchase your qualifying license in order to apply for the draw, a 2019 Habitat Stamp ($10) will automatically be added if you haven’t purchased one already for ages 18–64. Habitat Stamps are nonrefundable, even if you are unsuccessful in the draw. ▶ Go to cpw.state.co.us/habitatstamp for more information.




QUALIFYING LICENSES


All big game applicants must first purchase a qualifying hunting license BEFORE applying for the big game draw. Online draw applications will not be accessible until you purchase your qualifying license. Qualifying licenses are: * Spring turkey * Annual small game, * Annual resident combination small game/fishing * Veteran's lifetime resident combination small game/fishing Licenses must be valid for April 1 of the current license year thru March 31 of the following year. Licenses are available for purchase starting March 1. A Habitat Stamp ($10) will be automatically added when purchasing your first qualifying license each year, if applicable.




CARCASS TAGS


You must attach a carcass tag to animals you harvest per instructions on tag. Tags must be signed, dated and detached from the license immediately upon harvest. ▶ The carcass tag should be attached to the carcass (not to detached hides, horns, antlers or carried separately) immediately prior to and during transportation in any vehicle, or while in camp or at a residence or other place of storage. Tags must stay on until meat is processed and remain with meat until consumed. ▶ The carcass tag, when dated, signed and attached to the species lawfully taken or killed and lawfully in possession, authorizes the possession, use, storage, and transportation of the carcass, or any part thereof. ▶ It is illegal to sign or tear the tag before harvesting an animal. ▶ Do not remove any parts of a license except the carcass tag after harvest. Doing so voids the license and you must buy a duplicate. The upper part of the license must be kept by whoever harvested the animal. ▶ If you lose, accidentally destroy or detach the tag, you must buy a duplicate from a CPW office before hunting and prove the loss, detachment or destruction was accidental. ▶ If you have a nonresident big game/fishing combo license, the fishing license is valid after the carcass tag is detached, as long as the rest of the license is intact.




EVIDENCE OF SEX


1. It is illegal to have or transport a big-game carcass without evidence of sex naturally attached. It is illegal to have only detached evidence of sex accompany the carcass. If you submit a deer or elk head for CWD testing, leave evidence of sex on the carcass. 2. EVIDENCE OF SEX IS: A. BUCK/BULL: Head with antlers or horns attached to carcass; or testicle, scrotum or penis attached to carcass. B. DOE/COW:Head, udder (mammary) or vulva attached to carcass. C. BLACK BEAR: Male: testicles or penis. Female: vulva. 3. Heads detached from carcass are not adequate evidence of sex. 4. If a carcass is cut in pieces or deboned, evidence of sex needs to be attached to a quarter or another major part of carcass. All portions must be transported together. 5. Evidence of sex is not required if a donation certificate accompanies less than 20 pounds of meat or after the carcass is cut into processed meat, wrapped and frozen, or stored at licensee’s home. TIP:If you shoot a young buck or bull with antlers less than 5 inches long, it can be considered “antlerless.” But what do you do about evidence of sex? ▶Leave the head and antlers naturally attached to a portion of the carcass to prove it meets the requirement. ▶Leave the testicles attached to a portion of the carcass, and then you can detach the head or skull plate and carry it out with the antlers intact.





 
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